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KotW: Pork with Pears, Lentils, and Plum Sauce February 5, 2009

Posted by panterazero in all-in-one, exotic!, fruit, herbs & spices, Kip of the Week, pig pig pig.
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[In North America we have an odd attitude toward fruit; we want to cook it only when it’s perfectly ripe. That insistence makes for great apple and peach pies and strawberry jam, but in other contexts it’s awfully limiting. For example, what would the great Cuban beef dishes –- picadillo or ropa vieja or boliche -– be without a side of fried plantains? Unripe fruit is an estimable staple in savory cooking.

So find a few really rock-hard pears and try this. I give two slightly different versions, one using fresh plums if it’s the right time of year, the other substituting dried fruit and factory sauce. ]

1 1/2 cups green or brown lentils
two cups boiling water

two medium yellow onions, chopped
two tablespoons oil
one pound boneless lean pork, sliced

two to four unripe hard green pears, peeled and cored (depending on size, enough to make four cups chopped)

If you can get them:
four tart purple plums, seeded and cut up
Otherwise:
eight dried apricots
one-half cup Chinese or Japanese plum sauce, from a jar

four to six cloves of garlic
a piece of fresh ginger the size of a walnut, peeled and sliced
one-quarter cup dry sherry
one-quarter cup cider vinegar or rice wine vinegar
one tablespoon sriracha, or more to taste

Put the lentils in a large measuring cup, pour the boiling water over them, and let them sit. If you’re using the dried apricots, put them in a smaller cup, pour boiling water over them to cover, and let them sit too. Chop the pears.

Sauté the chopped onions in the oil, allowing them to brown generously. Add the sliced pork and stir until the meat loses its pink color. Add the chopped pears, the lentils, and the soaking liquid, stir, and leave at a simmer.

Drain the dried apricots, if you’re using them. In a food processor, mince the garlic and ginger till it settles on the walls of the tank. Add the cut-up plums OR the dried apricots, and purée. Add the sherry, the vinegar, the plum sauce if you’re using it, and the sriracha, and blend.

Pour the plum sauce over the meat-lentil-fruit mixture, turn up the heat and bring it to a boil. Ideally, the pears will still have a tiny bit of crunch, and the lentils will be nutty-tasting and firm. Correct the seasoning.

© /KC September 2008

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KotW: Unbelievably Complicated Borscht January 28, 2009

Posted by panterazero in all-in-one, chicken, holidays, Kip of the Week, potatoes, poultry, soups and stews.
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If you’re like me, your early experience of borscht was with the over-refined broth often served as a starter course for Jewish holiday dinners. It looks like cranberry-grape kool-aid and tastes like a nondescript root vegetable; if you’re lucky it’s elaborated with a few shreds of beet or carrot; and if you garnish it with sour cream it’s not bad, really.

Nahhhh.

With a tip of the chef’s hat to my old pal Harriett, I give here the recipe for the reason the Soviet Army beat the Waffen-SS; the borscht that was in the fuel tanks of the first Sputnik; borscht that could make a chronic emphysema patient run the high hurdles.  Plan about three days ahead to make an eight-quart pot of this stuff, which will take hours and cost you serious money. And when it’s done and boiling, if a wooden spoon won’t stand up in the middle of the pot, you missed the bullseye.

STEP ONE.

3- to 4-pound whole chicken
one large yellow onion
Seasoning as for Roast Chicken

Season the chicken and stuff it with the peeled onion. Roast it till done, but moist; water the roasting pan (at least) midway through so the drippings don’t burn.  Put the chicken in a bowl to catch the draining juices, and allow it to cool.  Strip the chicken (don’t be compulsive about getting the last of the meat off the carcass) and refrigerate the meat.

STEP TWO.

bones and skin of the chicken
pan drippings and collected juice
onion from cavity, sliced
2 carrots, sliced
3 stalks celery, sliced
bay leaf
1 clove garlic, smashed but not skinned

Put all the above in an 8-quart stockpot and cover it with 6 quarts boiling water, then simmer for several hours — I let it bake overnight in a 225-degree oven. Refrigerate until you can remove the fat easily, 24 to 36 hours.  Meanwhile

STEP THREE.

1 bunch fresh beets (4 to 8 beets depending on size) with greens

Cut the greens off the beets.  Stem the greens and wash them THOROUGHLY in 2 or 3 changes of cold water.  Boil the beets in lightly salted water for 15 to 20 minutes.  Shred the greens.  Let the beets cool slightly, peel and chop them.  Put beets and greens into a tightly covered plastic container and refrigerate.

STEP FOUR.

two pounds meaty beef short ribs (2-3 ribs)
two or three yellow onions skinned & diced
one or two peeled baking potatoes
one tablespoon oil
the stock from step two

Skim the fat off the stockpot. Lots of stock will stick to the stocktrash, so let it drain into a colander into a big bowl.  Discard the stocktrash. Wash out the 8-quart pot and brown the beef ribs in it; remove them to a plate.  Discard some of the fat, add the oil, brown the onions till golden.  Put the ribs on top of the onions, then strain in the stock through a fine strainer.  Bring to a simmer, cover and let simmer (not boil) for 3 to 4 hours.  Add the potatoes for the last hour. Meanwhile

STEP FIVE.

four carrots
six stalks celery
half a small green cabbage
four to six cloves garlic

Pare the carrots and cut them into chunks.  Wash and slice the celery.  Dice the cabbage.  Shred the reserved chicken.

STEP SIX.

Remove the beef ribs from the broth and let them cool, separate and shred the meat, and discard the bones and surplus tissue.  If you have a food processor, chop the garlic, then add the potatoes and a couple of cups of stock till everything is a thin smooth slurry.  If you don’t, mash the potatoes, press the garlic, and combine them while you add stock; the result won’t be as evenly thick but will still work.

Add the chicken, beef, potatoes and garlic, and beets to the broth and let simmer 30 minutes.
Add the carrots and celery and let simmer 10 minutes, stirring.
Add the beet greens and cabbage, bring to a slow boil and cook 10 minutes, stirring.  Serve.

There you have it, comrades; the borscht of commissars. And personally, I think topping this with sour cream would be like gilding a tank, but who am I to tell you what to do?  Enjoy, you’ve worked for it.

Plain Ordinary Borscht

So now you’re saying “Kip, only a maniac would go through that.”  And I look haplessly about the room for the maniac in question, and concede that you might be right.  I pretty much guarantee that if you make borscht from the elaborate recipe once a year, after a year, you will be so hungry for it that you will resign yourself to performing those miracles again.

But what if you just want, you know, borscht, and you don’t want it to take three days, but you certainly won’t stoop to the Manischewitz stuff in the jug in the supermarket?  Well…

For the carcass stock above, substitute four quarts of box stock.  If you do that, you might want to dice up a few boneless, skinless chicken thighs to give the stock some substance; and season it generously.

The irreducible minimum for borscht is:

    Stock containing one kind of meat
    a second kind of meat (as noted, beef short rib is great, but you can use beef chuck or pork shoulder)
    beets
    beet greens
    carrots
    onions
    a little garlic
    assertive seasoning.

With that as a base, you’ve actually got some latitude.  You can include the potatoes, or not.  You can add tomatoes, which traditional cooks in very old countries might sniff at, but they’re still good.  You can use other greens in addition to the beet greens; I’ve made fabulous borscht with kale.  You can add parboiled lentils.  You can add canned white beans.  If you use your imagination, you may arrive at something that some people wouldn’t call borscht, but so long as you call it delicious, there’s no harm done.  Enjoy!

A Note on Toppings

Contemporary supermarket sour cream needs to loosen up a little bit.  Stir in a little half-and-half or whole milk, while you watch the texture carefully — you want it still thick enough to stand up when it’s applied.  A little grated horseradish is a good addition.  Alternatively, use paprika, and use enough that you can taste it!

Another direction: a good slug of basil pesto, or walnut pesto, to top each serving.

© /KC January 2009

Curried Brussels Sprouts January 22, 2009

Posted by panterazero in all-in-one, exotic!, herbs & spices, Kip of the Week, tomato, vegan.
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Brussels sprouts can be one of the most assertively delicious vegetables that are easily available — even in winter.  Unfortunately, they also tend to be one of the most mistreated.  Your average brussels sprout ends up camouflage-green, soggy, leaky, smelling like overcooked cabbage and tasting worse.  What a sad fate for a truly aristocratic vegetable!  Forget steaming, or water in general, entirely, and do this instead.

two pounds very fresh brussels sprouts
four or five medium-to-large fresh tomatoes
two tablespoons corn or canola oil
two large, or three medium, shallots
two tablespoons curry powder
one-quarter teaspoon cayenne pepper, or one teaspoon chili powder
one 15-ounce can light coconut milk

Stand unopened can of coconut milk in saucepan full of warm water, possibly over very low heat.  (This is so all the coconut milk will come out of the can when you want to pour it in.)

Trim the stem end of the brussels sprouts and slice them in a food processor.  (They’ll come out a nice mix of slices and shreds, which is fine.)  Reserve.

Skin and chop tomatoes, but don’t drain.  Reserve, separately.

Mince shallots.  Mix thoroughly with curry powder and cayenne pepper or chili powder.

Heat oil in a wok or sauté pan.  Stir-fry shallot and spice mixture over medium heat just until everything starts to smell really good.  Add tomatoes with their liquid, turn up the heat, and stir-fry until almost all the liquid is gone.

Add brussels sprouts and stir-fry until green parts of sprouts are really bright green.

Pour in warm coconut milk and stir thoroughly until mixture is boiling.  Serve with rice or noodles.

© /KC January 2009

Thai Vegetable Stew January 3, 2009

Posted by panterazero in chicken, exotic!, Kip of the Week, soups and stews, Thai.
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Okay.  Our international readers don’t have this problem, but in the United States, the two holidays when turkey is classically served — Thanksgiving and Christmas — unfortunately happen to be only a month apart.  After two turkeys in the space of a month, it’ll probably be six months before you want to even think about cooking and eating another turkey, and six months after Christmas, you can’t find one to buy.  So, whether for personal or logistical reasons, we’re all through with turkey for the moment.  Let’s tackle something that in its format, in its ingredients, and in its seasoning is a complete relief.

Complicated?  Yes.  Healthy?  Yes.  Bliss-inducing?  Surprisingly.

First Day

Prepare stock:
2 quarts water
1 quart box chicken stock
6 boneless, skinless (Costco) chicken thighs; no need to thaw first
one whole stalk celery with leaves
a piece of fresh ginger the size of your thumb, peeled, and cut in quarters lengthwise
two bay leaves

Bring the water to a boil.  Add the stock and bring to a boil again (you don’t want to boil box stock very long).  Add all other ingredients, cover pot and put in 225° oven for 2 hours.

Take the pot out of the oven.  Remove the chicken thighs, put them on a plate or in a bowl, and refrigerate them.  Return stock to oven for another 2 hours.  Remove and discard the celery, ginger and bay leaves.  Cover the stock and refrigerate it overnight.

Second Day

Skim the fat off the stock, strain it if necessary, and warm it slowly.

Prepare garlic:
10 cloves garlic
2 T corn or canola oil

Chop garlic (a food processor helps) and mix it with the oil in a small microwave-safe bowl.  Microwave one minute at a time, checking, till the garlic takes on color, then thirty seconds at a time till the garlic is golden brown.  (This should take about three minutes total, but that depends very much on your microwave.  Don’t take it beyond golden brown or it may be unusable.)

Add to the stock:
the prepared garlic
one large yellow onion skinned and chopped
six medium carrots pared and cut in thick hunks
1 lb. white mushrooms washed and sliced thick

Bring to a boil, then simmer on lowest heat (you don’t want the carrots to disintegrate) for about an hour.  Meanwhile

Prepare the topping:
1 or 2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 green onions, white part and healthy-looking green part, sliced
1 cup Trader Joe’s Lime and Chile Peanuts [or:
1 cup roasted peanuts
half teaspoon red flake pepper
zested rind of one small lime ]

In a food processor mince the garlic, add the green onions and mince, add the peanuts and pulse-chop till everything is sort of chunky and sticky.  Put the mixture in a serving bowl and refrigerate.  Take the poached chicken thighs, remove and discard any fat, and shred the meat.

Stem and soak your greens (see below) if they’re not prewashed.

Add to the soup:
the shredded chicken
one 14-oz can coconut milk
2 to 4 small zucchini, diced
one 1-lb bag baby spinach
one bunch broccoli rabe, stemmed and chopped

Bring the soup to a boil and stir just until the zucchini is tender.  Serve very hot with the topping on the side; the serving spoon for the topping should hold a generous tablespoon (e. g. Chinese soup spoon).

© /KC January 2009

Chickpeas and Eggplant December 17, 2008

Posted by panterazero in African food, Kip of the Week, tomato, vegetarian.
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I’ve been doing “chickpeas, onions and tomatoes” for years — there’s an Indian name for the combination that I forget — but I finally came up with the truly delectable variant, so here it is.  It’s easy, but you do need to watch the eggplant carefully.  A warm oven, such as you would have if you were for example baking dessert, is also helpful.

one medium eggplant, chopped small
1/4 cup olive oil
2 leeks, white and light green part only, washed and chopped (do save the rest for stocktrash)
one 15-oz can chickpeas with 1/4 cup of the packing liquid
2 cups (half a jar) good grade tomato basil pasta sauce, OR
2 cups good marinara sauce and 1/4 tsp dried basil, crumbled
1/3 cup shredded parmesan or asiago cheese

crusty Italian bread, like a ciabatta

Put the eggplant and oil in a saute pan with 1/4 cup of water and bring the mixture to a boil, then turn the heat to medium, cover, and cook about 15 minutes.  You want all the water to steam away and the eggplant to get truly soft while it browns on the bottom.  When it’s done, stir-scrape the browning back into the mixture.

Add the leeks and stir till they too are tender, slowly adding the packing liquid from the chickpeas if you need it to forestall burning.  Stir in the chickpeas, red sauce, dried basil if you’re using it, and the packing liquid if you didn’t already.  When the mixture is bubbling nicely, top it evenly with the cheese, and slide the pan into that warm oven till you need it.

Serve over big torn chunks of warm bread.  This is so delicious that, the night I first made it as a vegetable side dish, it turned into the main course.

© /KC December 2008

Pantera’s Meatloaf December 10, 2008

Posted by panterazero in herbs & spices, Kip of the Week, red meat.
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Announcement

I was recently invited by our administrator, Junk Food Girl — hereinafter referred to as NetHeadChef — to become a full voting member of this blog, and I accept humbly and gleefully.  From now on I will be posting as panterazero, the name on my birth certificate, rather than as Kip of the Week.  And I hope that I will properly answer the honor that has been done me.

Pantera’s Meatloaf

Many of us are just emerging from a stretch of concentration on poultry — personally I’m still using up the dark meat from our Thanksgiving turkey — and, because the US holiday calendar is so odd, we’re about to enter another one.  So, given what I said earlier about saving red meat for special occasions, let’s have some while we’ve got a chance.  I messed around with half a dozen meatloaf recipes from prestigious (or dilapidated or both) cookbooks before I realized that, by its nature, the tastiest meatloaf is also quick and simple.

Preheat oven to 400°F (375°F convection)

four cloves garlic
two slices whole-grain bread, toasted dark and broken up
one teaspoon dried oregano
one teaspoon dried marjoram
one teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon red flake pepper
one large onion, diced
one generous pound ground beef
one generous pound ground turkey
two eggs
one 7-oz. can El Pato Mexican tomato sauce
1/4 cup whole-grain mustard

1/4 cup good commercial barbecue sauce or bulgogi sauce mixed with 1/4 cup water

In food processor, mince garlic, then add bread and grind to crumbs, add dried herbs and pepper, and pulse.  Add to large bowl.

In food processor, mince onions, add to bowl.

Add ground meats, eggs, El Pato sauce, and mustard. Combine with a large spoon or with your hands, and mix thoroughly, but don’t overwork the mixture. Mound the mixture onto the pan. Bake 15 minutes at 375°, then reduce heat to 325° and bake about 1 1/2 more hours, until the juices in the pan have browned and the internal temperature is 150°.  For the last fifteen minutes of baking, brush with the thinned-down barbecue sauce to glaze.

Let cool slightly, cut into nice thick slices, and serve with pico de gallo, mango chutney, or sriracha.  This recipe is as good cold as hot.

© /KC December 2008

Guest of the Week: Walnut Balls December 3, 2008

Posted by schizodigestive in appetizers, cheesy goodness, Kip of the Week, tomato, vegetarian.
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These are from my longtime friend Anne, who paints landscapes, designs databases, plays the flute, and lives in the coastal redwood forest north of San Francisco. Her home is smack in the middle of one of the most beautiful parts of California, and here’s what she does with it.

This appetizer, like most of what Anne does, is excellent in a way that you’ll really notice. I make them once a year at the outside, because I want everybody to wait for them — they’re that good.

Mix together:

one cup walnuts, ground
one cup Parmesan cheese, grated
one cup breadcrumbs

Sauté until soft:

one large carrot, grated
one medium potato, grated
one medium yellow onion, grated

Combine the two mixtures and add:

Three eggs

The result should have about the same consistency as meatloaf. Roll this mixture into balls about an inch and a half in diameter. Sauté in butter or oil until firm and well browned.

At this point you can do one of two things. Bake these in a glass dish at 300° for 15 minutes, then serve them on toothpicks as appetizers — in which application they’re sort of like falafel, but a lot better. Or you can keep going:

Three or four Yukon gold potatoes, sliced fairly thin
Walnut balls as above
One 28-ounce can diced tomatoes (or whole ones cut up)

In a buttered baking dish, arrange overlapping potato slices. Add walnut balls in one layer. Pour tomatoes over. Cook covered in a 350° oven for one hour.

© Anne Kessler December 2008

KotW: Roast Poultry, Part Two: Stockmaking November 28, 2008

Posted by schizodigestive in Kip of the Week, poultry, soups and stews.
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In these days of chicken nuggets and microwave popcorn, stockmaking is nearly a lost art and — worse yet — sounds as if it deserves to be. The mere idea of taking an awkward, grease-coated poultry carcass, putting it in a pot with cold water, vegetables, and seasonings, and heating it carefully for four to 12 hours sounds so… pre-Civil War. Or at least pre-World War II. But I am here to single-handedly (it sounds so much better than “single-voicedly”) call for a renewed national interest in stockmaking; and I have two reasons you can’t possibly ignore.

1) As I write, good-quality commercial poultry stock costs between $2.50 and four dollars a quart. A large chicken carcass will make two to three quarts of stock, and a turkey carcass will make four to six, which — even after adding in the cost of vegetables, seasonings, and cooking — will go a long way toward reimbursing you for the bird. Argue with free meat!

2) Even without the economic argument, stock that you can make is better than what you can buy, anyway. And if you have fresh or frozen stock, you’re at least halfway to making soup, which is a terrific idea in general.

tools

6- to 8-quart thick-walled pot (not iron) and lid
mesh colander
eight-quart mixing bowl
mesh strainer
slotted spoon

materials

chicken or turkey carcass with skin and shreds of meat, broken into small pieces
reserved pan drippings and bits
juice from platter, if any
1 large onion, peeled and sliced or grated, from cavity or fresh
2-3 carrots, rinsed, topped and sliced or grated (no need to pare)
2-3 stalks of celery, rinsed and sliced thin, with leaves
2 cloves of garlic, skins on, smashed
2 bay leaves

Following the roasting directions I posted earlier will give you a carcass ideally seasoned for stockmaking. Bring 3 to 6 quarts of water (depending on size of carcass) to a boil in the pot, add ingredients and cover. Bring the pot to a boil again, but don’t leave it there; either reduce the heat to a simmer and cook the stock on the top of the stove for four to six hours, or leave it covered in a 225deg oven for 12 to 18 hours. The oven method produces more substantial stock, if it’s practical for you.

The temperature of a stockpot is very important, and should be verified with a meat thermometer if you have any doubt. Less than 170deg — or 180deg to be sure — isn’t safe; more than 205deg will begin bubbling, break up the sediment and sludge that should stay at the bottom of the pot, cloud the stock, make it bitter, and force you to strain it through cheesecloth or fine mesh before you use it. If you keep the temperature well below boiling, the sediment will stay at the bottom and you can pour the clear stock off the top through an ordinary plastic mesh strainer. If your recipe needs better filtration than that, use the plastic mesh strainer and then a fine wire strainer. Beyond that, I refer you to the arduous chemical methods lovingly set forth in classic French cookbooks. Bear in mind that severe filtration will lessen flavor.

Set up a colander in a big steel mixing bowl. Take the stockpot out of the oven or off the heat. With a slotted spoon or something like it, scoop all the solid trash from the stockpot into the colander, and let the stock drip off the trash into the bowl, which should take about half an hour. Discard the trash, rinse the colander, put the colander back in the bowl, and pour the rest of the stock through it; this will take out the last few big pieces. Take out the colander and empty it again. Rinse and wipe out the pot and pour the stock from the bowl, through the strainer, back into the pot.

Refrigerate the stock for 24 to 48 hours, remove the fat, optionally strain the stock one last time, and use it or freeze it in Ziplocs.

© /KC November 2008

KotW: Hot Carrots November 26, 2008

Posted by schizodigestive in appetizers, Kip of the Week, vegetarian.
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[Junk Food Girl is right; there have been two major episodes of culinary slacking in the last month, one provoked by volunteering for the election, and the other made necessary by the priority of untangling the chaos that my finances, etc., had become during the recent political frenzy. Therefore, I’m going to give you two for the price of one, as it were — a holiday appetizer you can make now, and stock-making instructions in time to get the most from the carcass of your turkey.]

Hot Carrots

In the 21st century, you can find “Mexican” cooking in various degrees of fidelity in almost every part of the United States… but it was not always so. In Boston in the early 1970s, all we knew about was Mexico City Mexican food, which mostly meant elaborate plate dinners with tortillas on the side… if any! So my first collision with Mexican food in the manner of a taqueria was as a tourist in San Diego in 1976 — where I also encountered these for the first time. Over the years, they’ve become sparse as a free side dish, which is too bad, since they’re great. Luckily, they’re also ridiculously easy to make.

one pound carrots, preferably four or five big ones
one-half cup pickled jalapeno pepper slices (“nacho slices”) with a little of their juice
one-half medium yellow onion, optional
one-half teaspoon dried oregano
one-half teaspoon dried thyme
two bay leaves
2 cups (about) rice wine vinegar or, lacking that, white vinegar

Set up either a large saucepan of water, or a double-boiler-type covered steamer, and bring it to a boil. Top, tip, and pare the carrots, and roll-cut them into bite-size pieces. If you’re using the onion, skin it and slice it thin. Steam or boil the cut carrots for three to five minutes, depending on how tender you like them — I tend toward the shorter time. Meanwhile, in a nonreactive quart container (a yogurt container is perfect), combine the pickled peppers, the optional onion, oregano, thyme, and bay leaves.

Add the carrots while they’re still hot from cooking, and quickly pour over enough vinegar to cover. Put the lid on the container and refrigerate it at least overnight. As simple vegetarian appetizers go, this is one of the best ever. Happy Thanksgiving!

ETA: I got asked “What’s the best thing to do if you want your hot carrots hotter?” Good point since my batch for Thanksgiving came out not all that hot.

It seems to me this would be a perfect application for Tabasco sauce — either red or green — which is vinegar-based. Don’t go wild, you don’t want to obliterate the flavor of either of the primary ingredients.

© /KC November 2008

KotW: Pan-Roasted Potatoes. November 15, 2008

Posted by schizodigestive in Kip of the Week, vegetarian.
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For years I wondered about the best way to cook potatoes to accompany a roast chicken or other roast. Baked potatoes are easy, but bland, and the temptation is to add a lot of calories to fancy them up. Boiled potatoes require an extra burner, and a lot of their flavor ends up in the cooking water. Mashed potatoes are so much work, and so rich, that in my house they’re for holidays only.

But years ago, Junk Food Girl and I were roommates for a while (bet you would never have known!) and she taught me a trick with potatoes, and then I fiddled with that…

Six to 12 flavorful potatoes; I like Yukon golds but you can use Finnish golds, russets, red creamers…
one tablespoon oil
one-half cup cold water
one-half teaspoon Creole seasoning
one-half teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste

Cut potatoes into bite-size pieces; with Yukon golds this usually means cut in half, then each half in quarters. Have a big heavy skillet ready and warming on the stove. Then do one of two things: either toss the potato chunks with the oil and the water and put them in the skillet; or, if you have an oil sprayer, put the potatoes and the water in the skillet, then spray the potatoes generously with oil. Let the skillet heat on the stove just until the water starts boiling — which won’t take long!

Dust the potatoes with the Creole seasoning and pepper, and put the skillet on a rack in the oven, above whatever you’re roasting. If you’re roasting a chicken at 325°, put the potatoes in about half an hour before you turn off the oven, and leave them in for the 20-minute stabilizing period before you remove the chicken. If you’re roasting something that comes straight out of a hot oven, put the potatoes in for the last 25 to 40 minutes depending on temperature.

These potatoes will be assertive and full of flavor, because they barely encounter water, they’re sharply seasoned, and the browning is nice and even. Because they come to the table in a hot skillet, they’re still hot when they’re served, unlike hash browns. And they’re so easy!

(And thank you sarawr, if I didn’t say that already.) /KC