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Pantera’s Meatloaf December 10, 2008

Posted by panterazero in herbs & spices, Kip of the Week, red meat.
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Announcement

I was recently invited by our administrator, Junk Food Girl — hereinafter referred to as NetHeadChef — to become a full voting member of this blog, and I accept humbly and gleefully.  From now on I will be posting as panterazero, the name on my birth certificate, rather than as Kip of the Week.  And I hope that I will properly answer the honor that has been done me.

Pantera’s Meatloaf

Many of us are just emerging from a stretch of concentration on poultry — personally I’m still using up the dark meat from our Thanksgiving turkey — and, because the US holiday calendar is so odd, we’re about to enter another one.  So, given what I said earlier about saving red meat for special occasions, let’s have some while we’ve got a chance.  I messed around with half a dozen meatloaf recipes from prestigious (or dilapidated or both) cookbooks before I realized that, by its nature, the tastiest meatloaf is also quick and simple.

Preheat oven to 400°F (375°F convection)

four cloves garlic
two slices whole-grain bread, toasted dark and broken up
one teaspoon dried oregano
one teaspoon dried marjoram
one teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon red flake pepper
one large onion, diced
one generous pound ground beef
one generous pound ground turkey
two eggs
one 7-oz. can El Pato Mexican tomato sauce
1/4 cup whole-grain mustard

1/4 cup good commercial barbecue sauce or bulgogi sauce mixed with 1/4 cup water

In food processor, mince garlic, then add bread and grind to crumbs, add dried herbs and pepper, and pulse.  Add to large bowl.

In food processor, mince onions, add to bowl.

Add ground meats, eggs, El Pato sauce, and mustard. Combine with a large spoon or with your hands, and mix thoroughly, but don’t overwork the mixture. Mound the mixture onto the pan. Bake 15 minutes at 375°, then reduce heat to 325° and bake about 1 1/2 more hours, until the juices in the pan have browned and the internal temperature is 150°.  For the last fifteen minutes of baking, brush with the thinned-down barbecue sauce to glaze.

Let cool slightly, cut into nice thick slices, and serve with pico de gallo, mango chutney, or sriracha.  This recipe is as good cold as hot.

© /KC December 2008

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Comments»

1. sarawr - December 10, 2008

Only with you would a “simple” meatloaf include marjoram, El Pato, and two kinds of meat. 😛

2. panterazero - December 10, 2008

I literally have a meatloaf recipe, from a published cookbook by a renowned author on the East Coast, that includes ground beef, ground pork, ground veal, julienne vegetables, and we won’t even discuss the seasoning.

as for the El Pato, I take it as a personal obligation to make it more popular at every opportunity. we can’t just make complacent assumptions only to discover one day that it’s gone.


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